A new poll finds people have gotten into heated arguments with family members over politics, and the polarized views are persisting. Hillary Clinton still gets high negative marks. Cliff Owen ASSOCIATED PRESS
A new poll finds people have gotten into heated arguments with family members over politics, and the polarized views are persisting. Hillary Clinton still gets high negative marks. Cliff Owen ASSOCIATED PRESS

Elections

Want to have a Merry Christmas? Avoid discussing Trump or Clinton

By David Lightman

dlightman@mcclatchydc.com

December 21, 2016 08:40 AM

UPDATED December 21, 2016 09:13 AM

WASHINGTON

Want to have a happy holiday season? Avoid talking about politics and news.

An NBC-Wall Street Journal poll found that 48 percent of Americans said a family member or friend had shared a false news story with them, a story the friend or family member thought was true.

Nearly one-third said that over the past year they had avoided talking politics with a family member because of differences in political opinions.

Nearly the same percentage had engaged in a heated argument with friends or family about the election.

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for unlimited digital access to our website, apps, the digital newspaper and more.

Social media was no refuge, the Dec. 12-15 poll found. Twenty-two percent said they had been harassed for their political beliefs, and 17 percent had blocked or unfriended someone because of the campaign.

Then again, few seemed passionate about their candidates to begin with. The poll found that 31 percent “were excited about a presidential candidate for the first time.”

The political polarization persists. Forty percent said they had very or somewhat positive views of President-elect Donald Trump, while 46 percent reported somewhat or very negative views of the next president.

Thirty-two percent saw Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in a positive way, while 54 percent gave her very or somewhat negative marks.

Clinton: Fake news 'epidemic' is 'putting lives at risk'

In her remarks at event the honoring outgoing Senate minority leader Harry Reid (D-NV) on Thursday, Hillary Clinton called fake news an “epidemic.” She went on to say “It is now clear that so-called fake news can have real world consequences."

C-SPAN

David Lightman: 202-383-6101, @lightmandavid